Whiteboard Image Cleanup with BoofCV

Whiteboard Image Cleanup with BoofCV

Good morning fellow code monkeys! Today I’d like to talk about computer vision, and how it can be used in a fairly basic fashion to process whiteboard images and improve them. This technology is fairly mainstream, but the reader should be warned that Microsoft holds a patent on rectifying whiteboard images, but I doubt it would stand up in court. There are also many other patents that seem similar. As always, make your millions at your own risk.

Text Classification via PPM Compression and Decision Trees

Text classification is a common machine learning task which is known in various contexts as sentiment analysis, language detection, and category tagging. Many standard AI tools can be used on text given an appropriate feature selection function, which essentially transforms text down into a high-dimensional vector. However there are also certain techniques that work directly on the text, and this article is about a couple of those techniques that are enabled and demonstrated by the new release of the CharTrie component of the SimiaCryptus utilities library.

Text Modeling, Compression, and Markov Strings

The recent wave of publishing and releases included a particularly interesting text analysis component that I’d like to talk about today. There are many possible uses, including text classification, clustering, compression, and creation. Most people would most likely recognize this as the data structure behind Markov strings or full text indexes. This new component is logically a Trie Map that counts n-grams. The idea is that we can break text down into a number of overlapping n-grams, ie N-character strings like the 4-grams “frog” or “n th”.

Publishing to the Internets

Over the past several years I’ve practiced self-publishing my research projects, both by public GitHub archives and via articles on this blog. Doing so required very little effort, and it was important to me that my research be accessible. An interested reader could easily clone and build any of the projects I have discussed in previous articles, and that was good enough. I have now taken the next step in self-publishing open source software: I have configured maven deployment to the central maven repository, and have also configured and published sites for each module using GitHub Pages.

Decision Trees as a Service

I discussed in my previous blog post a distributed software transactional memory library I was implementing in Scala. Being a platform, it is hard to demonstrate without some interesting application running on it. I have thus created a decision tree service - a RESTful api to populate, train, and query decision tree structures. As the majority of this post will discuss the decision tree service, I would like to emphasize that this is merely a demo application for a research-grade platform.

reSTM - RESTful Software Transactional Memory

In today’s article, i am excited to announce the release of my new project, reSTM. The idea is to implement a database layer based on software transactional memory, allowing client-side business logic to operate generically against a database with transactional guarantees. Additionally, the memory access protocol is designed as a JSON REST service, encouraging transparency and interoperability. I believe this approach can fill an under-addressed need in modern software technologies, with its scalable NoSQL approach to transactional data.
Specialized Loss Functions for Regression

Specialized Loss Functions for Regression

Normally, when performing regression to fit an analytical function to data, there are only a couple standard “textbook” methods to follow. The first is a least-squares fit, usually solved via gradient descent or matrix methods. The other is single-class SVM. This article will discuss a variant on the least-squares method by exploring different loss functions and the resulting behavior. Let us begin by identifying function candidates. I find it useful to think of these functions as potential wells; it provides a good physical intuition and my descriptions will reflect this viewpoint.
Deblurring with TensorFlow

Deblurring with TensorFlow

Blurred Image Deblurred Image Recently, Google open-sourced a toolkit called TensorFlow which provides a platform for neural networks. It provides a native core written in C, and many examples written in Python. Although the architecture is extensible and will hopefully will be usable from Java/Scala application code in the future, I took some time recently to evaluate it using Python to perform deconvolutions (a.k.a. deblurring), the same task I recently wrote about using my own NN library.
Modeling Network Latency

Modeling Network Latency

Website request latencies, as a dataset, are odd. I can think of no other dataset I have encountered so frequently in my work, but when you do research about this dataset online, you find amazingly little compared to similar topics. Therefore, let’s talk about this today - specifically, what does the ideal statistical model for website latency look like? The background for statistical modeling is large, and it is covered in several different approaches.
RE: The anatomy of my pet brain

RE: The anatomy of my pet brain

In my last post, I talked about a new project I was working on to explore convolutional neural networks (CNNs). I’ve spent much of the time since playing with and iterating on this library, and I wanted to take a moment to share what has been built so far. I’ve ended up with a library of 30 network layer types which can be wired in an arbitrary directed acyclic (non-recurrent) graph/network and perform gradient descent training and optimization.